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The 21 best places to visit in Australia

Byron Bay, New South Wales

The 21 best places to visit in Australia

21. Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia

Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia

Ningaloo Reef is located off the coast of Western Australia, about 800 kilometers north of Perth. This stunning stretch of coral reef is home to tropical fish and turtles, manta rays, dugongs and many other species of sea life. It is also one of the best places in the world to swim with whale sharks during the months of April to July.

The World Heritage-listed reef covers an area of approximately 2,000 square kilometers, making it one of the largest fringing reefs in the world. It is part of the Ningaloo Marine Park, which includes the Coral Sea Islands Marine Park. These parks protect over 300 islands and cays, including Ningaloo itself, which is home to around 20,000 large colonies of nesting seabirds.

20. McLaren Vale, South Australia

McLaren Vale, South Australia

If you’re looking for something special to do during your next trip to Melbourne, why not head down to McLaren Vale in South East Victoria and enjoy a few wineries and some great food.

Located a short 40-minute ride from the capital city of Melbourne, it’s easy to access and offers stunning views across rolling hills and the ocean.

You’ll find many different types of wines here, including shiraz, cabernet sauvignon, chardonnay and pinot noir.

The area is known for producing high quality reds, such as shiraz, grenache, mourvèdre, merlot and cabernet sauvigon, while white varieties include riesling, gewürztraminer, semillon, viognier and chardonnay.

There are also smaller boutique wineries where you can taste award winning wines.

And don’t forget about the food – there are lots of places to eat too, ranging from casual cafes to fine dining restaurants.

19. Hyams Beach, New South Wales

Hyams Beach, New South Wales

The sunrise at Hyams Beach was beautiful. Jervis Bay NSW Australia

Jervis Bay in southern NSW is home to some of the most beautiful beaches in the world. One such beach is Hyams Beach, where turquoise waters lap against pristine white sands. This picturesque spot is popular among tourists and locals alike.

The area around Hyams Beach is well known for surfing, fishing and swimming. There are many great spots to go surfing including Currarong Beach, Point Peron, Bathery Beach, and others. If you enjoy fishing, there are plenty of fish species living near the shoreline. Some of the common ones include Barramundi, Cod, Flathead, Mackerel, Salmon, and Tuna.

Hyams Beach is located about 20 minutes away from Sydney CBD. To reach it, take bus number 711 from Central Station. Alternatively, you can travel via train from Sydney Central Station to Wollongong Train Station. From there, catch a taxi or hire a car to get to the destination.

18. Cradle Mountain, Tasmania

Cradle Mountain, Tasmania

Cradle Mountain, Tasmania

The Cradle Mountain-Lake Saint Claire National Park in Tasmania is home to some of the best scenery in Australia. If you want to see it all, there are plenty of hiking options within the park. There are over 30 kilometers of walking tracks around Lake Matheson and Lake King William. You can even go for a longer trek along the Great Western Track, which takes about three days.

If you don’t feel like doing any hiking, you can still enjoy the views from the car without having to walk anywhere. You can head out onto the road and take photos of the stunning mountain ranges while driving. Or, you can pull off the main highway and stop at the lookout points where you can view the beautiful landscapes.

You can also spot the Northern Lights in the area during winter months. This happens due to the high altitude of the region. In fact, the highest peak in the park reaches 3,100 meters above sea level. If you do happen to spot the Northern Lights, make sure to keep your eyes peeled because it could be very bright.

17. Daintree Rainforest, Queensland

Daintree Rainforest, Queensland

Daintree Rainforest, Queensland

The Daintree Rainforest is one of Australia’s most visited attractions. This sprawling swath of jungle covers over 1,200 square kilometers and is home to many unique species of plants and animals. Visitors can explore the forest via walking trails, canoeing expeditions, wildlife spotting cruises, or even ziplining through the treetops.

16. Lake Hillier, Western Australia

Lake Hillier, Western Australia

Lake Hillier, Western Australia

Lake Hillier is one of the world’s most photographed lakes. It’s located off the coast of Western Australia, just south of Perth. The turquoise waters are surrounded by lush green vegetation and dotted with islands.

The lake is named after John Hillier, the founder of the Swan River Colony. He discovered it while exploring the area in 1827. On his return to England he described the lake as being like a mirror.

15. Lord Howe Island

Lord Howe Island

Lord Howe Island is one of Australia’s most isolated destinations, located off the coast of New South Wales. The island is home to some of the world’s rarest species, including the endangered black robin and vulnerable blue duck. There are no cars, roads or motorbikes on the island — visitors arrive by boat.

The island spans about 8 square kilometers and is surrounded by reefs and shallow water, making it ideal for diving and snorkeling. On land, there are hiking trails, picnic areas, camping sites and accommodation options. You can even spend the night under the stars.

Hiking Mount Gower is the best way to explore the island. This peak offers stunning views over the ocean, while the hike down takes you along the coastline. If you prefer to relax, there are plenty of swimming holes where you can cool off in crystal clear waters.

Blinky Beach is another popular spot. Located just north of the town of Eden, the beach stretches for almost 3 kilometers. Swimming here is safe because the bay is protected by coral reefs. Visitors can enjoy the white sand and turquoise sea.

You don’t have to go far to find somewhere quiet and serene. Most of the island is covered in dense rainforest, giving rise to lush vegetation and wildlife. In fact, the island is home to more than 300 bird species, including the critically endangered black robin.

14. Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory

Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory

Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory

Kakadu National Park is located in the Northern Territory of Australia. This national park covers over 2 million hectares and it is home to some of the most spectacular sights in the world. Located near Darwin, Kakadu offers visitors a chance to see ancient Aboriginal rock art at Ubirr and at Nourlangie. There are also numerous trails to hike along, including ones that take you to a number of waterfalls where you can witness the power of nature up close. Other highlights include canoe trips down the billabongs, walks through lush forests and even visits to remote Indigenous communities.

The park is known for its unique wildlife too. Visitors can spot kangaroos, koalas, echidnas, lizards, snakes, goannas, platypus, freshwater crocs, saltwater crocodile and many different bird species. One of the most famous animals here is the majestic emu. You’ll find plenty of opportunities to feed and interact with the creatures during tours.

13. Byron Bay, New South Wales

Byron Bay, New South Wales

Byron Bay, New South Wales

Byron Bay is a bustling seaside town in northern New South Wale. It attracts thousands of visitors each year, drawn by its stunning coastline, laidback vibe and picturesque scenery. The region boasts some of Australia’s most beautiful beaches and surfing hotspots, including Lennox Head, Woolgoolga, Ballina and Cape Byron National Park. There are plenty of things to do here too, from relaxing on the beach to exploring nearby towns like Mullumbimby and Lismore.

12. Glass House Mountains, Queensland

Glass House Mountains, Queensland

Panoramic view of Glass House Mountains at sunset visible from Wild Horse Mountain Lookout, Australia

Glass House Mountains are located in the heart of the Sunshine Coast Hinterland. They are one of the most popular destinations amongst locals and visitors alike.

The mountains consist of eleven peaks, ranging from 80m to 210m high. Each peak offers something unique to do while exploring the area. Some offer stunning views, others adventure activities, and some even provide accommodation.

There are many things to see and do here, including hiking, mountain biking, fishing, camping, abseiling, swimming, rock climbing, quad biking, bird watching, and much more.

If you want to experience the best of Glass House Mountains, there are plenty of options to choose from. There are several walks around each peak; however, the most popular ones include the Glasshouse Mountain Walkway, the Glasshouse Mountain Circuit, and the Glasshouse Mountain Bike Trail.

You can book accommodation in the surrounding towns, such as Maroochydore, Caloundra, Nambour, Mooloolaba, and Coolum. These places offer everything you could possibly need during your stay.

11. Cape Tribulation, Queensland

Cape Tribulation, Queensland

Cape Tribulation, Queensland

Cape Tribulation is a beautiful place to visit in Australia. With stunning views, lush rainforests and gorgeous beaches, it’s no wonder why it’s been named one of the world’s most beautiful beaches. Here are 11 reasons why you should make Cape Tribulation part of your next holiday adventure.

1. You’ll find some of the best surf spots in the world here.

2. It’s home to the Great Barrier Reef – the largest coral reef system in the world.

3. And there are plenty of activities to keep you busy while you explore the area.

4. Hiking trails lead through the rainforest and along the coast.

5. You can even go diving and snorkeling off the shores of Cape Trib.

6. The town itself is picturesque and full of character.

10. Noosa Everglades, Queensland

Noosa Everglades, Queensland

Noosa Everglades, Queensland

One of two Everglads (the other being the Great Barrier Reef), the Noosa Everglade offers visitors the opportunity to experience Australia’s natural beauty while getting up close and personal with Australian wildlife. Kayaking or hopping on a boat to explore its tranquil waters, which are bordered by incredible green scenery, is one of many activities you can enjoy here.

9. Bungle Bungle Range, Western Australia

Bungle Bungle Range, Western Australia

Bungle Bungle Range, Western Australia

The Bungle Bungle Range is one of the most spectacular geological features in the world. Located within the UNESCO-listed Purnululu National Parks, it consists of over 300 dolomite domes, some of which are up to 50 meters high. They are formed from millions of years of wind erosion, and are now home to many different species of plants and animals.

8. Litchfield National Park, Northern Territory

Litchfield National Park, Northern Territory

Litchfield National Park, Northern Territory

Known for the picturesque Florence falls, Litchfield national park in the Northern Territory is one of Australia’s most beautiful parks. Located just north of Darwin, it’s home to a variety of wildlife including kangaroos, wallabies, echidnas, koalas and platypuses. There are numerous hiking trails throughout the park where you can enjoy spectacular views of the surrounding landscape and take in the sights of the many waterfalls scattered around the area.

The park is open daily from 8am to 4pm during summer months and 8am to 5pm during winter months. Entry costs $10 per person.

7. The Pinnacles Desert, Western Australia

The Pinnacles Desert, Western Australia

The Pinnacles desert an Namboung National Park. Western Australia, 2012.

The Pinnacles Desert in western Australia is one of the most unique places on Earth. This eerily beautiful landscape is home to thousands of limestone formations that rise up from the barren ground like giant towers. These mysterious rock formations are known as “pinnacles,” and they’re actually part of the Nambung National Park.

The Pinnacles are located about three hours west of Perth, and there are no roads leading into the area. To reach the park, travelers must either take a tour or fly over the region in a helicopter. There are some great options for tours, including ones that include stops at the famous pinnacles.

6. The 12 Apostles, Victoria

The 12 Apostles, Victoria

The 12 Apostles, Victoria

The 12 Apostles are located along the coast of Australia’s southernmost state, Victoria. They form part of the Twelve Apostles National Park, and visitors can climb among them to take in breathtaking views of the surrounding landscape.

5. Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park, Northern Territory

Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park, Northern Territory

Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park, Northern Territory

Home to the Anangu people and the sacred sites Uluru and Kakadu, the national park includes some of Australia’s most beautiful landscapes. A trip here is a must for anyone travelling Down Under.

The UNESCO World Heritage-listed site is a must-visit for all Australians and international visitors alike. Spend one minute in the stunning beauty of this region and it’ll be clear why Uluru is so important.

4. Broome, Western Australia

Broome, Western Australia

Broome, Western Australia

Broome is located just north of Perth, WA, and is famous for its gorgeous coastline, laidback charm, and warm hospitality. With over 2 million tourists each year, there are plenty of things to do here. Whether you want to relax on the beach, take a surf lesson, go fishing, hike along the spectacular coastal cliffs, or head out into the desert to explore ancient rock art sites, Broome has something for everyone.

The city itself is home to many great bars, restaurants, cafés, galleries, boutiques, parks, and historical buildings. There are even several wineries within easy reach. If you’re looking for some adventure, try parasailing, jet boating, swimming with dolphins, snorkeling, diving, whale watching, scenic flights, horse riding, surfing, or simply relaxing on the pristine sandy beaches.

There are also lots of activities for kids, such as dolphin feeding, sea lion encounters, wildlife tours, bush walks, kayaking, gold panning, crocodile spotting, camel rides, family fun days, and more.

3. Whitehaven Beach, The Whitsunday Islands

Whitehaven Beach, The Whitsunday Islands

Whitehaven Beach, The Whitsunday Islands

The Whitsunday Islands are a picturesque collection of 74 islands in north-eastern Australia. They lie just off the coast of Airlie Beach, making them easy to reach from there. With such stunning scenery, you’ll want to spend some time exploring the area. Here are our favorite things to do in the Whitsundays.

2. Wineglass Bay, Tasmania

Wineglass Bay, Tasmania

Wineglass Bay, Tasmania

Wineglass Bay is one of Australia’s most popular tourist destinations. Located in the Freycinet National Park, it’s a beautiful little beach surrounded by rugged cliffs and towering mountains.

In fact, it looks exactly like a bottle of red wine resting against a mountain range. You know what else looks like a bottle of red? A hike up Mt. Wellington.

The Freycinet Peninsula is home to some of the best scenery in Tasmania. There are plenty of places to explore and things to do, including walking tracks, beaches, caves, national parks, wineries, breweries, distilleries and much more.

If you’re looking for something different to do, why not take a trip to Wineglass Bay? It’s a great place to unwind and relax.

#Tasmania #Australia #NatureReserve #Beach #HikingTrail #Unsplash

This video features the views of the stunning Lake District region of England. The landscape is rich in history and culture, boasting many castles, old churches, quaint villages, and picturesque towns. This video showcases the beauty of Lakeland, England and how to travel around the area.

1. The Great Barrier Reef, Queensland

The Great Barrier Reef, Queensland

The Great Barrier Reef, Queensland

The Great Barrier Reef is located off the coast of Queensland, Australia. While it covers approximately 2,900 miles, only a small portion of the reef actually lies within Australian waters. The rest extends into international waters, making it part of the Coral Sea Marine Park.

While the Great Barrier Reef is often referred to as “the largest living structure on Earth,” the term is relative. A better way to describe the reef is as a vast collection of corals and marine life that covers some of the richest ocean floor habitat on Earth.

The Great Barrier Reef stretches along nearly 700 kilometers of Australia’s northeast coast. It’s a UNESCO World Heritage Site and spans several different states including Queensland, New South Wales, and the Northern Territory.

The Great Barrier reef is known for many things – it’s beauty, it’s size, it’s importance for tourism, and it’s fragile ecosystem. But what people don’t know is that the Great Barrier Reef isn’t just one massive reef; it’s comprised of thousands of smaller reefs that cover hundreds of islands.

In addition to being a tourist destination, the Great Barrier Reef serves as a vital resource for coastal communities around the globe. And while Australia receives much of the attention for the reef, it’s actually the third largest barrier reef system behind those found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea.

The Great Barrier is best experienced via boat tour, and visitors can choose from cruises that take them throughout the reef, or stop at specific locations such as Lady Musgrave Island. Some tours offer passengers the chance to swim with sharks and turtles, and others allow guests to see underwater plants and animals.

There are dozens of companies offering trips to view the Great Barrier Reef, and choosing the correct cruise depends on where you want to go and what experiences you’re looking for. For example, if you want to experience the full length of the reef, consider booking a trip with a larger vessel that allows you to make multiple stops. If you’d rather focus on seeing certain species, book a trip with a smaller ship that takes you directly to the area where you’ll find the fish and whales.

 

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